Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Rejection Letters- From a Positive Perspective

I have two sons.  My eldest is the quiet and obedient one who  is wise beyond his years.  My youngest son...well, let's just say that I try to look at him with a positive perspective.  Here is how I would describe him:

He is a good negotiator
(translation:  he's sometimes spoiled and gets what he wants)

He has perseverance
(translation:  he whines)

He has good leadership skills
(translation:  he is bossy)

He takes a stand on what he believes 
(translation:  he is stubborn)

He is very passionate
(translation:  he gets temper tantrums)

When I received a rejection letter from a publisher, I couldn't help but wonder about the hidden message behind the fluff.  In other words, what are they really trying to tell me? Here's how I read into their messages:

It does not fit our editorial needs
(translation:  It's not up to our standards because...it sucked.)

We hope that you will be successful in placing it elsewhere
(translation:  Go find somewhere else to submit because...it sucked.)

Be assured your submission received close consideration.
(translation:  We hoped it was good, but it wasn't because...it sucked.)

Okay...I'm sure that's not what they're really saying, but I know that's how some of us take it. 

From now on, I propose that we look at our rejection letters in a new light! 


 "Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones, you'll start having positive results." ~Willie Nelson

With a new outlook and a new attitude, here is what your rejection letter is telling you:

It does not fit our editorial needs
(translation:  We are not worthy of your outstanding manuscript.)

We hope that you will be successful in placing it elsewhere
(translation:  Your story is so awesome that we think you deserve better.)

Be assured your submission received close consideration.
(translation:  We are honored that you chose us to submit to, but we can't accept your manuscript because it's just too good for us.)

Okay, I went a little overboard on the translation. But it doesn't hurt to drown our sorrows in a bowl of ice cream drizzled with chocolate syrup, a wallop of whipped cream, and a cherry on top. 

www.sxc.hu

As long as you did your research, had your manuscript critiqued and revised numerous times, is as best as it can be and you are in love with your story, then know that your manuscript will find its way to the right publisher for you. 

So hold your head high and think positive.  Better than that, keep on writing!  The more stories you write, the better the chances of you finding that gem that will land you a contract instead of a rejection letter. 

" A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty." ~Winston Churchill

If you received a rejection letter and need something to make you feel better about it, I recommend reading the following posts:

36 comments:

  1. I love this, Romelle! Actually, your work is so good, publishers should be writing query letters to you:

    Dear Ms. Broas, Would you be interested in placing your manuscript with an internationally-known publishing house? We are particularly suited to your needs because we have published five picture books with a similar theme as yours (but not as well done, of course.) we look forward to your response.

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    1. LOL! Love it, Sylvia! Only in a perfect world...

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  2. This made my day!!! Thanks for the fresh perspective on rejection letters. Life sure is better with a sense of humor.

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    1. Glad you enjoyed it, Laura. May you have many more acceptance letters to come. Looking forward to your new PB by Zonderkidz!

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  4. Romelle...I love this post!!!

    Firstly because I saw my own son (I am staying with him and his wife right now, awaiting the birth of their first baby) in comments about yours...I always remind parents that many of the 'negative' traits of their children will be seen as positive ones when they are grown...stubborn=tenacity and determination.

    I also love how you interpreted the comments in rejection letters...so very funny!
    And the quotes from Churchill and Willie Nelson are perfect.
    I will be sharing this along. :)

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    1. Tenacity and determination. Love it! Those are wise words for parents, Vivian. That's great that you get to be there for the birth of your grandchild. I'm sure he or she will grow up to be wonderful! Thanks for sharing my post. Glad you enjoyed it.

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  5. I think Sylvia is on to something - we ought to write a few LOR to ourselves! Great post Romelle!

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    1. Yes, I agree! Sylvia's letter made my day. Wouldn't it be funny if we all wrote one and posted it on 12x Facebook page. It would be a letter to all of us!

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  6. great post, Romelle! You made me feel positive and hopeful!

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    1. Thanks BJ. Then mission accomplished.

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  7. aw, to heck with the rejection letters - break out the chocolate!

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    1. Ha-ha-ha! Chocolate always makes me feel better. But if the rejection letters keep coming, I am going to end up a chocoholic.

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  8. Thanks for the giggle! I needed that! Thanks for posting the links to other great articles, too!

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  9. Thanks for making me smile. Great post. BTW I think your younger son must be related to my younger daughter, they sound exactly the same! :-)

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    1. With qualities like that, they have a bright future ahead of them. My son just announced to me that he wants to be a lawyer...fitting.

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  10. This is fabulous, Romelle! I've just shared it with the Children's Book Hub FB Group.

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    1. Thanks, Beth. That is nice of you to share. <3

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  11. Fantastic, Romelle! Simply perfectly wondrously fantastic! Since everyone has already shared it all over FB I'll tweet it :)

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    1. And you are perfectly wondrously fantastic, Susanna!

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  12. THanks for the laugh, Romelle. I needed it today!

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  13. Great to read this. Just got a rejection today!

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  14. Well played Romelle! I suppose just think of it as you have a perfectly good key. The editor has a perfectly good lock. It's just your key doesn't fit her lock. Now you on a wonderful adventure to find the lock which fits your key and open the treasure! Yay!

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    1. What a fabulous analogy, Lauri! An adventure it is.

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  15. Great job Romelle! Love the lead in about your sone...you cracked me up!

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    1. Thanks for stopping by Lisa! Aren't you supposed to be resting about this time? Well they say that laughter is the best medicine so I wish you well!

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  16. This made me laugh, Rommelle. Love the way you "spin" things. Perhaps you should become a speech writer for politicians. LOL!

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    1. Ugh. I am sorry I misspelled your name. Shame on me. :-(

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    2. Ha, ha! Actually, my son is good at this. I should add that to his list.

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  18. Oooh! I love your new translations. LOL! I'm sure the second group is a much more accurate reflection of your work!

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  19. Catching up on all my blog reading today. I love this post!

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